MCoE commanding general visits PEO Soldier

By Debi Dawson
Program Executive Office Soldier
Public Affairs Officer

FORT BELVOIR, Virginia, (Feb. 28, 2017) – The commanding general of the U.S. Army’s Maneuver Center of Excellence visited Program Executive Office Soldier to see the future for Soldiers.

Maj. Gen. Eric J. Wesley visited PEO Soldier Feb. 15. PEO Soldier briefed how it is working with MCoE requirements—and inputs from Soldiers—to develop and field uniforms, protective equipment, weapons, and sensors and lasers.

“I want to have a relationship with the PEOs,” Wesley said. The general has commanded MCoE since March 18, 2016.

Maj. Gen. Eric J. Wesley, Commanding General of the Maneuver Center of Excellence, and Brig. Gen. Brian P. Cummings, Program Executive Officer Soldier, talk about how to reduce Soldier Load and improve Soldier capability.

Maj. Gen. Eric J. Wesley, Commanding General of the Maneuver Center of Excellence, and Brig. Gen. Brian P. Cummings, Program Executive Officer Soldier, talk about how to reduce Soldier Load and improve Soldier capability.

During the mission briefing, Brig. Gen. Brian P. Cummings, Program Executive Officer Soldier, stated 80 percent of his organization’s work comes from MCoE requirements.

Much of what PEO Soldier is working on are ways to lighten Soldier load. Wesley agreed with that assessment and added the importance of increasing Soldier capability. PEO Soldier is working on that throughout its portfolio, such as Nett Warrior, Family of Weapons Sights, Common Remotely Operated Weapon Station, Joint Effects Targeting System, and Heads-Up Navigation Tracking and Reporting. The latter is an augmented reality system that provides situational awareness, positive location indicator, and real-world navigation and waypoints.

Sgt. 1st Class Anthony K. James explain how Nett Warrior and Heads-Up Navigation Tracking and Reporting work to Maj. Gen. Eric J. Wesley. James is with U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center.

Sgt. 1st Class Anthony K. James explain how Nett Warrior and Heads-Up Navigation Tracking and Reporting work to Maj. Gen. Eric J. Wesley. James is with U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command’s Communications-Electronics Research, Development and Engineering Center.

“This is where we are going to go,” said Cummings about HUNTR.

Concerning Soldier capability, the Warrior Integration Site briefing to Wesley showed how Soldier capability has grown from 2001 to 2016 with a minimum increase in Soldier Load. WinSite gives the ability to examine how Soldier equipment will fit on Soldiers, interact with their movements, and affect energy usage.

At the FWS presentation, PEO Soldier explained to Wesley how Soldiers can use the technology to fire weapons without exposing themselves to enemy fire.

“Does this mean you can shoot from defilade?” Wesley asked. FWS will allow Soldiers to engage the enemy from behind a berm. It includes three variants: FWS-Individual, FWS-Crew Served, and FWS-Sniper.

Lt. Col. Michael P. Frank, Product Manager Soldier Precision Targeting Devices, explains to Maj. Gen. Eric J. Wesley how Joint Effects Targeting System works.

Lt. Col. Michael P. Frank, Product Manager Soldier Precision Targeting Devices, explains to Maj. Gen. Eric J. Wesley how Joint Effects Targeting System works.

The Army will soon announce its new Jungle Combat Boot. It is part of the Product Manager Soldier Clothing and Individual Equipment Portfolio within Project Manager Soldier Protection and Individual Equipment. Lt. Col. John T. Bryan, PM SCIE, said the Soldier Enhancement Program helped PEO Soldier to identify commercial-off-the-shelf solutions.

“We already knew what we wanted,” said Bryan, who added there were 3,000 Soldier inputs on the JCB.

After a day of learning about boots, helmets, body armor, sensors and lasers, weapons, and Soldier power Wesley was happy with the approach PEO Soldier is taking in improving the combat effectiveness of the Soldier.

“We have to grow this Army correctly,” Wesley said.

About Debra Dawson